There is nothing that doesn’t move. As close as scientists have tried to achieve absolute zero where nothing moves, they have not. Or is there?

Earth is consumed with motion as is the whole Universe. Most plentiful is the ocean of ocean surface and currents beneath, clouds, rivers, streams, etc. There is motion too inside the hardest rock, ice, steel, and everything else in nature. Its motion slow, medium, and fast.

Where did all this motion come from? It came from our Sun, of course. Early Earth was a ball of molten magma that cooled down to what we have now. The sun caused it all. The sun moves constantly, and so do we. Earthquakes, avalanches, tornadoes, hurricanes, you name it…its all motion.

We are motion – circulation, muscles, breathing, thinking, molecules vibrate all the time. It’s called Brownian Motion. Some guy named Brownian looked at water under a microscope and he saw molecules of water bouncing around and moving at random. How can there be any motion in a 150 pound anvil? Atoms, electrons, nuclei, those little suckers move. Light…is it a particle of a wave. Makes no difference, there is motion in light.

All this potential energy wants to move faster. Motion is spent energy. It is potential, then kinetic, back and forth, slow and fast. Standing still is motion

Earth is motion, we revolve, rotate, process and have done so for eons and even before this. Yet, who is to say that first motion came from no motion. Certainly the big bank started motion off and running. My arm, my hand, the keyboard I used to type this essay, all came from an amazing painting on the cover of a journal. The painting is just the surface of water whipped up by wind. After I looked at this cover, I had to write this essay. Thanks for popping by. The next post will #200!

 

Tom Stock

Tom Stock has been involved in the Long Island environmental and outdoor education community for decades.

He has published two books; THE NISSEQUOGUE RIVER: A JOURNEY and HIDDEN AGENDA; A POETRY JOURNEY.He has also published many essays and poems in such journals as the Long Island Forum and The Long Islander.